Spud, Ben and Larry

“Just look at that!”

Whatever was in my hands and lap was thrown onto the floorboards of the van.  “Stop, please!!”, came the over-excited request from me, ” Let me out!”

Fanatic, passionate, over-excited or just plain crazy.  That adjective I will leave to you.  All the same, I was out of the van and quietly jogging up beside a jolly-looking fellow driving a team of gorgeous Belgian horses on a country dirt road in Vermont.

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There in the road was a jolly fellow and his beautiful team of Belgian horses.

“Excuse me,” I said quietly, not wanting to startle the driver or the 3,500 lbs or more of the team of horses he was driving.  They had blinders on, so I knew to move slowly and quietly.

 

Sitting comfortably on an old school bus seat (he told me that what it was), attached to an iron sled, he quietly pulled the horses to a stop.  The one nearest me turned his big head towards my voice.  When he saw me, I was confident they would not startle.

“May I pet them?”

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My older twins and I so happy to meet these magnificent horses.

“Yep,” came the reply of the jolly man whose name was Larry.

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The jolly man, Larry, said we could have a ride!

They were happy for a stop, and delighted to be admired and petted.  Spud, the ‘old’ man, is thirteen years old.  He is the teacher to Ben, the three year old youngster.  Facing the team from the wagon, the experienced/teacher horse is usually on the left, the young/student horse on the right.  Larry kindly answered all our questions, and then I just had to ask,  ” Is it possible you could give us a ride on the sled?”

To our utmost joy, Larry said, “Yes!”  I sat beside him on the seat, my older twin sisters stood behind and took photos, and asked more questions.  Our friends stood in the road and took more photos.

 

Larry drove the team up a hill and down another road.  He stopped at one point to let the horses have a rest.  We switched riding so all could have a turn.

Larry said he was training the team for pulling contests, that is why they were pulling the iron sled.  He has been driving horses since he was a small kid.  His father worked his entire farm with horses, they had no tractors. Driving on the road requires great attention in case the horses get spooked and watching for cars around corners in the middle of the road.  Great care is given in training the horses so they behave in public.  Just like little kids they learn quickly what they can get away with.  If allowed to get away with bad behavior they will try again, and sometimes grow even worse in bad habits.  Spud and Ben were perfect gentlemen.

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Spud, the teacher, is happily having, Ben, the youngster scratch his ear!

It seems every work horse I have ever met has a one-syllable name.  I have to quote the answer because it made me smile,  “I think all the horses we have ever had had short names…guess you don’t want to be hollering long names.”  Well, that settles that.

 

Larry and his wife, Betsy, own Sugarbush Farm Maple & Cheese Farm in Woodstock, Vermont.   They have farm fresh cheese and maple syrup.   Call them at 802-457-1757, find them on facebook, or

click here to find their link

 

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Thank you, thank you, Spud, Ben and Larry for the grand ride!

 

 

 

 

You are a What? A PFO? What is That?

PFO, Primary Farm Operator. That is what I am, and is what I do. This title was given to me by my twin sister several years ago. Actually, she is a PFO as well. Are you?

We are the main care personal or Primary Farm Operator on our farms, or ranches as my twinster, who lives in Colorado says. It is a growing movement in the rural parts of our country. Where woman are the mainstay, while husbands have full-time, away-from-the-farm jobs.  Indeed, we have a small farm because our husbands do work an outside job.

Making ‘livable’ money from farming alone is pretty much non-existent. Most especially for small farms. Father Harry (aka my husband, Bill) has worked away from home for all our married years.  This PFO has considered the home and farm her business. It is true we have had our little farm for only thirteen years, and we have been married nearly forty years!  Those years before our farm, I considered myself the PHO, or Primary Home Operator.

I have always looked at our home as my ‘business’.  The way I saw and still do is;  no one–NO ONE has the interest in the prosperity and success of this business as I do.  The work has been lonely and long, as Father Harry travels far, wide, and often.  It has been a choice, an agreed upon choice by the two of us, and it has worked well.

Thirty years ago, the house was full of five active children and pets.  Now it is full both inside and outside of pets and animals.  Some would say the animals are better than the children.  Some would say children are better because “they grow up and go to college!”

I say they are similar in many ways.  For instance:  to leave the farm for any amount of time requires finding farm hands to do the work;  having healthy kids or animals is the product of attentive care and attention;  the work is never-ending;  the rewards are far greater than the back-breaking labor;  they all are more fun than television; they keep me young-at-heart;  they all make me smile.

Different tools and skills are required, of course, between home and farm.  There are excellent books on small-scale farming.  A good place to find them is Tractor Supply stores.  Tractor Supply also has great tools you will need.

Enjoy our blogs on something every PFO needs: A Tool Purse.  A Chain Saw.  A Tractor.  Click on links to read blog posts on these important farm tools.

Happy farming gals!

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Read about tools you will be sure to need in our link below:  The Tool Purse

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This tool is necessary.  A small one is very manageable for a PFO.

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Every PFO needs to be able to operate one of these wonderful tools!

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