No Guts, No Glory

Note This blog was written on Saturday, May 12, 2018.  In my haste to get it out, I failed to press the ‘Publish’ button.  I was out of town and was not able to get it out.  So, I send it now with belated Happy Mother’s Day wishes.  Though late, the wishes are still heartfelt for mother’s everywhere.

 

Motherhood.  Not the popular, most celebrated occupation; pay is not great; hours are long, and many times lonely;  no gossip magazines producing glamorous photos of it; or waiting in line to interview those working diligently in this occupation.  Yes,  it seems to be a rather unpopular profession.  It takes guts to be a mother.

 

Yet for those that want to embrace it to the fullest, it is an occupation of joy, riches, and times never to be had again.  Life is ephemeral.  Childhood is too.  It is an exciting way to go into a time one will never see.  That is through our children.  So as you celebrate being a mommy or grandmother today, enjoy!  Give this not-so-popular profession a thank you for all it has offered to you through your momma and to all it offers to your children because of you!

 

Happy Mother’s Day!  Here are flowers from our farm sent specially for YOU!  Happy Mother’s Day!!

 

 

 

You are a What? A PFO? What is That?

PFO, Primary Farm Operator. That is what I am, and is what I do. This title was given to me by my twin sister several years ago. Actually, she is a PFO as well. Are you?

We are the main care personal or Primary Farm Operator on our farms, or ranches as my twinster, who lives in Colorado says. It is a growing movement in the rural parts of our country. Where woman are the mainstay, while husbands have full-time, away-from-the-farm jobs.  Indeed, we have a small farm because our husbands do work an outside job.

Making ‘livable’ money from farming alone is pretty much non-existent. Most especially for small farms. Father Harry (aka my husband, Bill) has worked away from home for all our married years.  This PFO has considered the home and farm her business. It is true we have had our little farm for only thirteen years, and we have been married nearly forty years!  Those years before our farm, I considered myself the PHO, or Primary Home Operator.

I have always looked at our home as my ‘business’.  The way I saw and still do is;  no one–NO ONE has the interest in the prosperity and success of this business as I do.  The work has been lonely and long, as Father Harry travels far, wide, and often.  It has been a choice, an agreed upon choice by the two of us, and it has worked well.

Thirty years ago, the house was full of five active children and pets.  Now it is full both inside and outside of pets and animals.  Some would say the animals are better than the children.  Some would say children are better because “they grow up and go to college!”

I say they are similar in many ways.  For instance:  to leave the farm for any amount of time requires finding farm hands to do the work;  having healthy kids or animals is the product of attentive care and attention;  the work is never-ending;  the rewards are far greater than the back-breaking labor;  they all are more fun than television; they keep me young-at-heart;  they all make me smile.

Different tools and skills are required, of course, between home and farm.  There are excellent books on small-scale farming.  A good place to find them is Tractor Supply stores.  Tractor Supply also has great tools you will need.

Enjoy our blogs on something every PFO needs: A Tool Purse.  A Chain Saw.  A Tractor.  Click on links to read blog posts on these important farm tools.

Happy farming gals!

IMG_8597

Read about tools you will be sure to need in our link below:  The Tool Purse

img_7142

This tool is necessary.  A small one is very manageable for a PFO.

IMG_8698

Every PFO needs to be able to operate one of these wonderful tools!

Continue reading

Easter Tradition reminder from fellow Blogger

Easter supper was celebrated this past Saturday here at the farm.  It was a better day for all family members to get together before starting a new week,  however it knocked this PFO off her groove.

Though it was a thought in the mind of some of the grown children not a word was mentioned.  Nancy’s post on her blog, Two Trails One Road, was a reminder that something important had been forgotten.

 

Posted Easter day, April 1, 2018, her blog jogged the foggy memory of this farm gal.  That was only after reading it today, April 4, 2018.  Just the same, Easter morning found no freshly made Danish Pastry waiting for the hungry crowd.  Truth is, it was totally forgotten.  Never even thought of.  Sometimes cliches hit the nail right on the head—  making the pastry fell right threw the cracks of this farmers’ plans.

 

No sooner had Nancy’s post been happily read did it hit home.  In a hurried rush were things flying about the kitchen to make the “We have had it every year for forever,” tradition danish.  What a blessing the recipe is straightforward and turns out very well every time.

 

IMG_4068

The recipe is straightforward and turns out very well.

The almond flavoring gives this pastry a surprisingly nice and different flavor.  Toasted almonds are used also for they have a nice full flavor, and look very pretty as the topping on this family Easter Tradition Danish Pastry.

IMG_4075

He is Risen!  He is Risen, indeed!

Now life can move onto the next exciting moment.  Thank you, Nancy, for your reminder.

 

Know the farmer.  Know the farm.

Homemade is best.

 

Nancy’s blog site:     twotrailsoneroad.com